Lucy Miller Personal Trainer; Weekly Workout Plan

As well as training children, there is nothing I like more than training myself, friends and women who what to change their body. The thing is, if you’re after some serious body composition changes and ready to get fit, strong and lean, then you need to follow some guidelines;  

1) Lift heavy 1-3 times a week.
Heavy might mean your body weight to begin with or it might be some serious weights, it depends what level you are.  Just remember when lifting heavy you’re technique needs to be perfect. If you’re not sure how to squat, lunge or push press properly then invest in yourself and pay a personal trainer to help you. Just a few sessions should do the trick.

2) High Intensity Interval Training every other day
This can be done by either sprinting out doors, on a machine or with a skipping rope. Try going hard for 60 seconds followed by a 2 minute recovery for 20 minutes.

3) Yoga once a week 
Stretching needs to be given it’s own time and proper attention, the simplest way to be sure you are dong it is to join a yoga class. If you can spare the time, then buy a DVD that you can do at home or spend 15 minutes every night before bed with a foam roller and some stretch bands.

4) Walk – don’t take the car
A great one you can do with the kids – walking is fantastic for health. If you are already fit, it’s not going to give you big body composition changes but ievery little helps and it’s an excellent to reduce stress and  get some fresh air!

Get lifting, sprinting, stretching and walking – and if you need a helping hand, don’t forget to drop me a line. I’m here to help – miller82uk@yahoo.co.uk

Children’s fitness Academy; How to put an end to Childhood obesity

Childhood obesity is a complex issue with no simple solutions, but involving the entire family in weight loss and health may help kids achieve their goals!

A scientific statement released Monday in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Assn. reviews strategies shown to be successful in helping kids slim down.

For example why not try changing the kitchen around to make more wholesome foods more accessible?  Some studies this to be helpful in losing weight in the short-term.
or
Set small, achievable goals that are age-appropriate that may get kids to stick to more healthful habits, like walk to school three times this week, or try a new vegetable EVERY DAY!

Other useful approaches include praising kids for what they’re doing right — instead of punishing them for what they’re doing wrong – give them 50p extra pocket money when they have eaten all the vegetables on their plate, or take them to see their friends to play once they have helped you create a healthy shopping list for the week.

Sometimes a little something goes a long way – and who can put a price on health and well-being these days? No one! xx